Home / Uncategorized / PRAY FOR LIBERIA! New Heartbreaking Photos Released As Ebola Death Toll Reaches 4,033

PRAY FOR LIBERIA! New Heartbreaking Photos Released As Ebola Death Toll Reaches 4,033

Wrapped in a blanket: The pictures show the brutal effects of the virus on victims and their loved ones. Above, a victim's bodyI’m just going to put this story exactly in my own words because I cannot pretend that these gruesome deaths do not affect me.

In one of these photos taken by photographer John Moore for Getty Images, you can see this corpse of a young lady. Her name was Nama FambuleHer well polished toe nails are sticking out through the wrapper covering her…meaning she loved life as much as we do.

The next photos you’ll be looking at below are those of her mother crying with the children of the dead woman, her grandchildren crying beside her. Her sister is wailing inconsolably knowing full well that her dead sister will be burnt to ashes as is the procedure for Ebola victims. Even her husband weeps inconsolably.

The family insists the lady did not die of Ebola but from a year-long protracted illness. Liberian health authorities are not taking chances because most grieving relatives have been known to lie about cause of death so that the corpse of their loved ones will escape being burnt.

We as Africans know that we do not bury our dead like that. We give them befitting burials in a crowded funeral ceremony with people wearing aso ebi. We bury our dead over prayers in a proper grave with a headstone in memory. If the person was older, there will be cultural dancing and celebrations. That is why the pain fro an Ebola death is greater.

I remember during the the Ebola virus outbreak in Nigeria, It was a prayer point every morning during my family devotion. I also woke up at night to pray.

As a woman who shops for foodstuff in the Nigerian local markets, you know how it goes…people touching meat, fish, vegetables in a bid to haggle and get the best bargain. They touch and drop items, you come and pick them up to haggle as well. Each time I imagined the horror of that, and strange people shoving and bumping into me and saying: “Aunty, sorry ooo”, I’d just freak out. The thought of my kids exposed in school freaked me out even more.

This was enough motivation to get up even at night to pray. My neighbour across the fence is a retired commissioner of police. I heard him every night conducting Ebola vigil prayers. Through every collective effort, from our government to health workers and citizens, God answered our prayers.

I’m so happy about God’s intervention in ridding Nigeria of the Ebola virus. But I feel like that sister who survived a war by fleeing the war zone only to turn around and see that her younger sister who was running right behind her was caught in enemy fire and couldn’t make it.  I pray for Liberia every morning.

We all should intercede for our West African brothers and sisters, day and night until the situation improves. In the meantime, can any Liberia health authority official reach out to me? What can people from other countries do from here to help apart from praying? How effective are your Ebola health campaigns?Is Liberia applying best practices in curbing the virus? What efforts are being made to order for the several trial vaccines? How much pressure has been mounted on the World Health Organization (WHO) to expedite the delivery of an effective Ebola vaccine to Liberia?

According to WHO, the death toll in Liberia from the Ebola Virus outbreak has risen to 4,033. Do not forget that a terrible civil war claimed the lives of Liberians for about two decades. Just when the country was picking up its pieces, Ebola knocks at their door to claim even more lives. Let’s make this our business. #PrayForLiberia.

Grief-stricken: These photos, taken by photographers John Moore and Mohammed Elshamy, show the grim reality of the Ebola outbreak in Liberia, West Africa. Above, a woman crawls toward the body of her sister as an Ebola burial team takes it away for cremationA woman crawls toward the body of her sister as an Ebola burial team takes it away for cremation.

Distraught: The woman's sister, a market vendor, collapsed and died outside her home in Monrovia, Liberia,  while leaving to walk to a treatment center, according to her relatives. Above, the woman is seen grieving on the ground following the burial team's departureThe dead woman was a market vendor, who collapsed and died outside her home in Monrovia, Liberia, while leaving to walk to a treatment center, according to her relatives. Above, her sister is seen grieving on the ground following the burial team’s departure.

The late woman’s mother, Sophia Doe (right), and her young grand daughters weep as her daughter’s remains are removed for cremation on Saturday.

Horrific: Mr Moore and Mr Elshamy spent weeks working on the front lines of the fight against Ebola in a bid to capture the images

Horrific: Mr Moore and Mr Elshamy spent weeks working on the front lines of the fight against Ebola in a bid to capture the images

Beyond pain: In this image, Varney Jonson, 46, is seen crying out in pain as crews - donning white overalls, gloves and goggles - transport the body of his wife, Nama Fambule, to a crematorium following a year-long illness that he insists was not Ebola-relatedIn this image, her husband, Varney Jonson, 46, is seen crying out in pain as crews – donning white overalls, gloves and goggles – transport the body of his wife, Nama Fambule, to a crematorium following a year-long illness that he insists was not Ebola-related.

Restrained: The husband was visibly weeping and crying out as his spouse's body was taken away to be cremated on Saturday

Supporting each other: Mr Jonson grieves with family members as the body of his wife Nama Fambule is removed by Ebola crews

Upset: As the proper burial of loved ones is so important in Liberian culture, the removal of infected bodies for incineration is all the more traumatic for surviving family members. Many relatives attempt to convince burial teams to leave the bodies behindAs the proper burial of loved ones is so important in Liberian culture, the removal of infected bodies for incineration is all the more traumatic for surviving family members. Many relatives attempt to convince burial teams to leave the bodies behind.

Action: Family members and neighbors try to convince an Ebola burial team not to take away the body of Nama Fambule for cremation

Devastating effects: A woman grieves as Ebola burial team members arrive to take away the body of Mekie Nagbe, 28, for cremationA woman grieves as Ebola burial team members arrive to take away the body of Mekie Nagbe, 28, for cremation

In mourning: A woman falls to the ground before wailing and holding out her arms after hearing of the fate of her loved one

Action: Family members and neighbors try to convince an Ebola burial team not to take away the body of Nama Fambule for cremation

Striking all ages: Another photo shows crews removing the body of a four-year-old girl, wrapped in a blanket, from an apartmentEbola is striking all ages.Another photo shows crews removing the body of a four-year-old girl, wrapped in a blanket, from an apartment.

Taken away: Most cases of Ebola - which can cause a temperature and vomiting - were recorded in Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone

Securing the body: A member of an Ebola burial team straps down the body of Ms Nagbe, before taking it for incineration on Saturday

Keeping watch: A Liberian policeman is pictured watching as an Ebola burial team prepares to take away the body of Ms NagbeA Liberian policeman is pictured watching as an Ebola burial team prepares to take away the body of Ms Nagbe.

Turning to religion: A Muslim man holds his prayer beads as an Ebola burial team arrives to collect the body of a neighbor on Saturday#PRAYFORLIBERIA

 

 

Photo Credit: John Moore and Mohammed Elshamy photographed these gruesome scenarios for Getty Images. Thank you, sirs for telling the story of Liberia in captivating images like these. Hopefully the world will rise up and act. 

Photo Source: DailyMail UK

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About Peace

Peace is a wife and mother who reports and analyses global trends from the perspective of a Deeva; in the hope of invoking a thought process that will lead to a positive change.

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